Digital HRDigital TransformationThe biggest changes to workplace technologies

The biggest changes to workplace technologies

Graeme Codrington, Futurist at TalkTalk Business, talks to HRD Connect about the revolution of technology within business and what technology we can expect to see going forward…

How do you think we can educate the workforce on ever-changing technology?

Graeme Codrington

Interestingly, often technology adoption in the workplace is driven by consumer technology and the tools we use in our personal lives.

Back in the 1990s, when AOL instant messaging came to the UK, it didn’t take long before people were adopting it in the office. This year, we can expect companies to start using devices running Alexa for Business and experimenting with real-time translation apps.

Most people like technology that improves their lives or lightens their workloads. Companies would do well to communicate the benefits of these solutions to their employees to drive better engagement, and to encourage them to trial new technologies to better understand how they can benefit the workplace.

In many workplaces, this will require a significant mindset shift for the IT department, but it will be a shift worth making to empower people to discover and integrate new technologies at speed

If employees want to see more of the apps they use in their lives outside of work helping them in the office, then they should be having this conversation with their employers to find a workable solution for all involved. If discussions do go towards technology taking away jobs, businesses should focus on reskilling workers so that they understand how certain tasks, rather than whole jobs, could be allocated to machines, improving productivity for current employees.

What do you think is the biggest challenge for leaders, and indeed future leaders when addressing workplace technology?

Remaining adaptable and open to new ways of doing things is still a big challenge. Not every new technology will come with 100% proof of concept and ROI to satisfy the finance team. Consulting the IT department from inception and also letting them experiment with new solutions – within reason – could be a beneficial approach.

Knowing which technology is really going to take off from the outset can be difficult – so listening to employees and being open with newer solutions is a good way of going about your IT investment strategies. Design thinking, rapid prototyping and failing fast are new skills that must be learnt and applied.

It would also be a good idea for business leaders to play with available technology themselves! Virtual Reality (VR) gets a lot of coverage but how would leaders see the potential without trying it out first-hand?

Do you think virtual reality will change the way we traditionally work?

It’s hard to tell, as for workplace technologies to take off, mass consumer adoption tends to be key. VR has not quite become a mass market product yet, although we expect it to do so soon. VR software has improved, and we’re seeing it being used in business simulations and training more frequently.

Our Workforces 2025 campaign revealed only 8% of workers think that VR would become a core technology in their workplace, which suggests there’s a way to go in persuading them of its practical benefits, before we see widespread adoption of the technology in UK business.

Comments are closed.

What's Hot

Establishing an Organization Guidance System

Strategy & Leadership Establishing an Organization Guidance System

1m Dave Ulrich
2020: HRD Thought Leaders on the biggest trends of of the year to come

Strategy & Leadership 2020: HRD Thought Leaders on the biggest trends of of the year to come

2m Michael Hocking
HRD Summit UK 2020 - Sneak Peek

HRD Summit UK HRD Summit UK 2020 - Sneak Peek

1m Joe Talora
The Big Conversation and real cultural transformation: HRD Live Podcast with Amanda Cusdin, Chief People Officer, Sage

HRD Live Podcasts The Big Conversation and real cultural transformation: HRD Live Podcast with Amanda Cusdin, Chief People Officer, Sage

2m Michael Hocking
HRD Best of 2019: Culture and Engagement

Engagement HRD Best of 2019: Culture and Engagement

2m Michael Hocking
Do You Possess the Top Two Most In-Demand Skills?

Learning & Development Do You Possess the Top Two Most In-Demand Skills?

1m Jill Christensen

Related Articles

The impact of AI and automation on HR and the wider business

Digital HR The impact of AI and automation on HR and the wider business

4m Louron Pratt
How microlearning is transforming employee empowerment: Guy Van Neck, CEO and Founder, MobieTrain

Digital HR How microlearning is transforming employee empowerment: Guy Van Neck, CEO and Founder, MobieTrain

5m Michael Hocking
Making recruitment fast and fair with video interviews: Arik Akverdian, Founder & CEO, VCV

HR Technology Making recruitment fast and fair with video interviews: Arik Akverdian, Founder & CEO, VCV

6m Michael Hocking
Considering the impact of AI integration on employees

Digital HR Considering the impact of AI integration on employees

6m Jonathan Rennie
Is it right for leadership to ‘spy’ on employees? With Dave Ulrich

HR Technology Is it right for leadership to ‘spy’ on employees? With Dave Ulrich

6m Michael Hocking
The future of work – four trends for leaders to prioritize

Digital Transformation The future of work – four trends for leaders to prioritize

6m Stephanie Kelly
Man vs Machine – who is actually more biased?

Digital HR Man vs Machine – who is actually more biased?

7m Nathan Mondragon
Managing digital disruption in the workplace: Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe, SocialChorus

Digital HR Managing digital disruption in the workplace: Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe, SocialChorus

7m Louron Pratt