Digital HRHR TechnologyDriving transformation using real-time employee feedback

Driving transformation using real-time employee feedback

By James Anderson, Co-Founder, Peachy Mondays.


The pace of change in the world of work has never been faster. Becoming more agile and flexible is now a business requirement. It seems that change is the only constant and this can be tough for the people you rely on the most in order to achieve success – your workforce.

Change fatigue and employee burnout are becoming increasingly common. A 2018 Gallup study of 7,500 full-time employees showed that two thirds experience burnout on the job[1]. But to drive transformation, you need an informed and engaged workforce. And the first step is to understand what’s going on with your people.

Conventional feedback surveys lead to a dead-end

Employee feedback is fundamental to implementing change in businesses and workplaces successfully; but only if you collect it at scale, share and execute it correctly. However, traditional employee feedback surveys simply don’t deliver in the new world of work because the initial responses lead to a dead end. You’re then faced with the prospect of conducting focus groups and follow-up meetings to get to the root cause of issues. All this can take months and in the meantime your people may have moved on in their thinking (or moved on completely!)

But what if you could go deeper and understand the why behind what your employees are thinking and feeling? And get the results in near real-time?

An agile approach to employee feedback

Organisations around the world have adopted a new agile employee feedback platform, developed by HR technology company Peachy Mondays, to help them do just that, and at scale.

In his talk at this week’s HRD Summit in Boston, Peachy Mondays’ co-founder James Anderson, will highlight client case studies, like VodafoneZiggo, Brussels Airlines and Eurowings to illustrate how they’re using the platform to drive change.

Vodafone and Ziggo merged in January 2017. “With over 8,000 people in the newly-formed organisation, it was important to track employee sentiment during the merger, and beyond” says James.

Although both organisations had their own employee feedback tools, the merger was an opportunity to introduce a new, more agile solution that was flexible and easy to use while maintaining anonymity. Unlike other employee feedback tools Peachy Mondays is the only solution that features Targeted Anonymous Dialogue™, a way of having follow-up conversations so you can get to the root cause of issues and take action.

For VodafoneZiggo, unexpected Net Promoter Scores (NPS) led to follow-up conversations using Targeted Anonymous Dialogue™. These revealed a lack of awareness of products and services across the newly formed organisation. The company took action and its NPS has increased significantly as a direct result of post-survey communications and activity.

Tracking employee sentiment using the change curve model

A large and complex programme of change, involving over 10,000 employees, faced Brussels Airlines and Eurowings when they came together in 2017. It was crucial for the leadership and senior management teams to understand and predict how the changes were affecting people.

To help them track employee sentiment, Peachy Mondays developed a series of questions that align with the Kübler-Ross ‘change curve’ model. “The model has been adapted over the years and is based on the emotions that people experience following loss; from anger to acceptance,” James explains.

Every six weeks, employees are invited to participate in a pulse survey. The initial results, and the follow-up conversations using the Targeted Anonymous Dialogue™ feature, have revealed a need for more information about the changes. Brussels Airlines has ramped up its programme of internal communications and senior managers at Eurowings are adapting their integration plans to involve their teams more in moving forward.

Agile working requires real-time employee feedback

Organisations are recognising the need to become more entrepreneurial. Rigid staff structures and complex processes and procedures are stifling innovation and preventing them from operating with the speed and agility that the new world of work requires.

Use an agile approach to collecting and managing employee feedback, and get insights in real-time. Then take action. Visible, tangible action in response to feedback drives participation and engagement which is essential in moving your organisation through its transformation programme.

Subscribers can read more about these case studies next week, exclusively on HRD Connect.

[1] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/237059/employee-burnout-part-main-causes.aspx

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